Ancient Stones

Cornwall is full of ancient standing stones – monuments to a bygone time.  We visited three of these on our drive back from the Minack Theatre.

Mên-an-Tol

Mên-an-Tol is a formation of three stones, about 20 minutes walk from the road between Madron and Morvah.  They are thought to date back to the late Neolithic or early Bronze Age.
IMG_9232
The stones are only around 4 feet high.

IMG_9224
But a low camera angle makes them look more impressive.

IMG_9231
And you need to put the camera on the ground to get the best shot!

 

Lanyon Quoit

IMG_9246
Lanyon Quoit is near to Mên-an-Tol but a lot closer to the road.  It was a bit crowded when we got there though as a herd of cows had taken up residence!

IMG_9238

IMG_9241
What are you looking at?

 

King Doniert’s Stone

Finally, (after a visit to the Jamaica Inn!) we got to King Doniert’s Stone, near the village of St. Cleer, just as the sun was going down.

IMG_9247

The stone (the one on the left in the photo above) is the decorated granite base from a Celtic memorial cross dating from the 9th Century.  It is believed to have been built to commemorate Doniert – the last recorded King of Cornwall.

IMG_9251
The taller stone is known as “The Other Half Stone” and was also built to support a granite cross.

All photographs were taken using a Canon EOS 60D with the 18-55mm “kit” lens and processed using Adobe Lightroom.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s